Tagged: Ayurveda Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mercurialmind 5:06 am on June 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ayurveda, , caffeine, food additives, HPA axis, hypomania, irritability, , Pitta   

    Recently I’ve experienced symptoms that seem more in the direction of hypomania than depression. I think this could be possibly due to drinking more caffeine in the afternoon, deliberately phase advancing my sleep schedule because of job, changing my diet and increasing my stress by working more hours. Some of my symptoms included racing/crowded thoughts, a decrease in the amount of sleep, and periods of extreme irritability. Today I had a bad case of rage over something minor and I realized that I had consumed junk food(Cheetos) and more caffeine than usual and at a later time.Rage in connection to junk food( MSG?) and caffeine is something that has consistently been a problem ever since a teenager. I noticed in the news that there recently has also been a connection with sodium nitrate and mania. It occurred to me that both sodium nitrate and junk food can induce severe thirst. Thirst/water balance is in turn intimately connected with the HPA axis. Perhaps an increase in cortisol here? The increase in excitability seems fairly close to when the food is eaten and the excitabilty is reduced by consuming water. Ayurveda would concur that food items which cause thirst would be the ones who would also increase irritability. Ayurveda would also say that an increase in thirst inducing foods would change one’s perception of temperature. This seemed to be the case since I felt much warmer than usual.

    Advertisements
     
  • mercurialmind 2:41 am on January 31, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ayurveda, , diet,   

    The relationship between diet, inflammation and depression 

    brain-research10

    A new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) found that the measure of brain inflammation in people who were experiencing clinical depression was increased by 30 per cent. The findings, published in JAMA Psychiatry, have important implications for developing new treatments for depression.

    A growing body of evidence suggests the role of inflammation in generating the symptoms of a major depressive episode such as low mood, loss of appetite, and inability to sleep. But what was previously unclear was whether inflammation played a role in clinical depression independent of any other physical illness.

    More research has come out which supports the link between inflammation and depression. While this link hasn’t been confirmed my experience has piqued my interest in the topic. For about fifteen years I have been experimenting with Ayurveda which is a form of medicine which originated in India a thousand years ago. In Ayurveda the world is divided up into three different categories(doshas in human body), Vata, Pitta and Kapha. Vata is associated with air, Pitta with fire/water and Kapha with water/earth. In the human body the various categories govern certain functions and areas. Pitta governs metabolism, heat regulation and the immune system. It is located in the eyes and small intestine. Various tastes/qualities are said to balance the doshas. Pitta is said to be balanced by sweet, bitter, astringent and coolness.

    For many years I have experimented with Ayurveda and discovered that balancing Pitta was very helpful, even more than balancing Vata which is associated in Ayurveda with the nervous system. Balancing Pitta is helpful especially in regards to anxiety, irritability and depression. Perhaps Pitta’s association with inflammation in Ayurveda might explain this. In addition, Ayurveda recommends a vegetarian diet for a Pitta type of imbalance, a vegetarian diet has been shown in western medicine to help with inflammation.

    Balancing Kapha, which is said to be localized in the stomach, has been helpful in regard to lack of motivation and energy. Balancing a dosha can aggravate another. Whenever I balance Kapha I notice Pitta becoming imbalanced. Balancing or pacifying Kapha can increase irritability which is a Pitta imbalance. In Ayurveda there are different methods of balancing more than on dosha. One way is to balance Vata which is believed to govern the other doshas. The second method is to balance the two using the qualities that balance the two doshas. In the case of Pitta and Kapha they are both balanced by bitter and astringent tastes. While this balancing act can be consciously performed I think it is also subconsciously performed when we have desert after a meal that has had too much salty and sour taste to it.

    Somewhat interestingly healthy food tends to be higher in bitter and astringent qualities while junk food is higher in salty, sour and sweet tastes. According to Ayurveda salty, sour and sweet all balance Vata which is associated with the nervous system and stress. Perhaps this preference is one reason why western cultures seem to have more problems with inflammation and depression.

     
  • mercurialmind 10:30 pm on December 16, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ayurveda, Green tea, , , Tea   

    Green tea improves symptoms of depression 

    some of that tea

    some of that tea (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

    A just came across a recent study that demonstrated that green tea could significantly improve depression symptoms, in particular anhedonia.

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis) extracts, as well as their main component, the polyphenol
    epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), reportedly have antistress, anticancer, and
    antioxidant effects. Recent studies suggest a beneficial association between green tea
    consumption and symptoms of depression; however, the underlying mechanism behind
    that association is unclear. Anhedonia, the inability to experience pleasure, is a
    characteristic of depression, marked by reduced pleasure, altered motivation, and
    disturbed reward learning.1,2 A reduced reward-learning function has been linked to
    persistent anhedonia in depressed patients.3

    “It has been evidenced that reduced dopamine neurotransmission might
    contribute to the anhedonia and loss of behavioral incentive in depressive disorder,
    therefore it is important to examine the regulatory role of green tea on the brain circuitry
    activated by reward learning,” write the authors.

    Compared with the control treatment, the green tea produced significantly greater
    improvements in the MADRS (P<0.01) and HRSD-17 (P<0.001) total scores.

    I’ve been drinking green tea occasionally and noticed that it seemed more stimulating than regular tea. This seemed odd to me since green tea has approximately half the amount of caffeine compared to black tea. According to this study and others the stimulating effects could be due to an increase in dopamine activity in the reward center of the brain.

    Green tea is recommended for Pitta and Kapha types in Ayurveda. Pitta types are said to have more problems with inflammation so green tea, which has an astringent quality to it, would be recommended. Inflammation has been shown to in turn to be associated with depression. I found one recent journal article in addition that supports the idea that tea, black or green, has anti-inflammatory properties.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel