Temperament could predict diagnosis and presenting symptoms

Your temperament could affect your diagnosis, presenting symptoms, and psychopathologic conditions. The results of a recent study indicate that distinguishing between the various temperaments of irritable, depressive, hyperthymic, and cyclothymic might be helpful.

The study researchers report that in their study of 129 patients, hyperthymic temperament showed a preferential association with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) and bipolar disorder not otherwise specified diagnoses (BD-NOS), whereas depressive temperament was more frequent in patients with bipolar II disorder (BD-II) and major depressive disorder (MDD).

Anxious and depressive temperaments were more frequent in current depressive and mixed episodes compared with manic ones, while irritable temperaments were most frequent in mixed episodes and in patients suffering from alcohol dependence compared with nondependent patients.

Additionally the study showed that hyperthymic temperaments protected against depressive and anxiety symptoms while it increased the temperamentssusceptibility towards manic symptoms. In contrast depressive, irritable, and cyclothymic temperaments increased the susceptiblity towards psychopathologic sysmptoms such as somatization, and interpersonal sensitivity.
The authors conclude by suggesting that temperament be taken into consideration when diagnosing and treating. Given the small size of the study and cross sectional design, the study needs to be replicated by others.

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